Arctic rain may soon be more common than snowfall

Projections from the latest models, published by an international team of researchers in the journal Nature Communications, show a steep increase in the rate and range of precipitation expected to fall in the Arctic, and that most of these future events will be rain. This shift is occurring due to rapid warming, sea ice loss, and poleward […]

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Molecular device turns infrared into visible light

Light is an electromagnetic wave: it consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields propagating through space. Every wave is characterized by its frequency, which refers to the number of oscillations per second, measured in Hertz (Hz). Our eyes can detect frequencies between 400 and 750 trillion Hz (or terahertz, THz), which define the visible spectrum. […]

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Seizures and memory problems in epilepsy may have a common cause

Damage to a part of the brain that regulates hyperactivity can contribute to both memory problems and seizures in the most common form of epilepsy, according to research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The study, published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience, may lead to earlier diagnosis of epilepsy and possibly new ways to treat epilepsy […]

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Study finds daytime meals may reduce health risks linked to night shift work

A small clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health has found that eating during the nighttime—like many shift workers do—can increase glucose levels, while eating only during the daytime might prevent the higher glucose levels now linked with a nocturnal work life. The findings, the study authors said, could lead to novel behavioral […]

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In developing countries, no quick fix for strengthening police–civilian relations

In an international study co-led by UCLA political scientist Graeme Blair, community policing efforts in six developing countries were ineffective in reducing crime or restoring civilians’ trust in law enforcement. The practice of community policing was developed in the U.S. in the early 1990s and has since gained popularity across the world. It typically involves collaboration […]

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Building a Synthetic World from Thin Air

As the world begins taking small steps to move away from its dependence on fossil fuels, researchers are increasingly looking for creative solutions to manufacturing the materials that make modern life possible. After Karthish Manthiram completed his postdoctoral studies at Caltech in 2016, he built a laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that advances the science […]

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Experts Urge Masking, Caution During Wait for Omicron Intel

The new omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus has arrived just in time for the holidays, and health experts say it’s not yet clear whether existing vaccines will fight it off as successfully as they have previous mutations. But more information is coming soon. Meanwhile, people should continue to mask, distance when they can, and make […]

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Rapid Test Identifies Antibody Effectiveness Against COVID-19 Variants

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a test to quickly and easily assess how well a person’s neutralizing antibodies fight infection from multiple variants of COVID-19 such as Delta and the newly discovered Omicron variant. This test could potentially tell doctors how protected a patient is from new variants and those currently circulating in […]

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