Eye conditions linked to heightened risk of dementia

Age-related macular degeneration, cataract and diabetes-related eye disease are linked to an increased risk of dementia, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. Vision impairment can be one of the first signs of dementia, and reduced stimulation of visual sensory pathways is believed to accelerate its progression. Some small studies have suggested there […]

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Improving biomaterials design for bone regeneration

Bone injuries in the face and skull—known as craniomaxillofacial defects—can be caused by sports injuries, vehicle accidents, or battlefield injuries. Repairing such defects is complicated because different types of cells need to interact with each other. In a new study, researchers are investigating the types of material used in reconstruction to see which one works […]

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Jet stream changes could amplify weather extremes by 2060s

New research provides insights into how the position and intensity of the North Atlantic jet stream has changed during the past 1,250 years. The findings suggest that the position of the jet stream could migrate outside of the range of natural variability by as early as the year 2060 under unabated greenhouse gas emissions, with […]

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Researchers develop new tool for analyzing large superconducting circuits

The next generation of computing and information processing lies in the intriguing world of quantum mechanics. Quantum computers are expected to be capable of solving large, extremely complex problems that are beyond the capacity of today’s most powerful supercomputers. New research tools are needed to advance the field and fully develop quantum computers. Now Northwestern University researchers have […]

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Finding Inspiration To Rebuild Human Heart Muscle

Advances in cardiac tissue engineering offer hope for an array of useful applications — from heart repair to disease modeling. As part of active, ongoing research related to bioengineering functional human organs, Adam Feinberg, the Arthur Hamerschlag Career Development Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and his team are finding inspiration from the […]

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Heavy metal proteins are the secret weapon in ant bites

Ants, scorpions and crabs are able to deliver powerful bites and stings thanks to the arrangement of heavy metal and halogen atoms on their teeth, claws and stingers, researchers have found. While larger animals use mineralised impact tools – such as antlers or teeth – smaller creatures need to deliver more power relative to their […]

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The future of ‘next generation’ DNA sequencing

Next Generation Sequencing has been with us for little more than a decade, but has already revolutionised biological science. According to Jonas Korlach, chief scientific officer of US-based sequencing company Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) we are now entering a golden age of sequencing technology and the advanced understanding of genetics it brings; ‘Now that we have […]

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Q&A: Time to put nature at the heart of what we do

A rising number of businesses is making the case for nature-based solutions already, but it is time to progress from early movers to a broad movement, says Jean-Eric Paquet, the European Commission’s Director General for Research and Innovation.  Nature’s back in business! Investing in nature-based solutions – using nature’s own resources to tackle environmental challenges […]

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Nuclear Weapons: How One Missile Could Blast Us To Pre-Industrial Times

The mushroom cloud of the first hydrogen bomb1 We’ve seen the clips. A clear blue sky suddenly filled with a mushroom cloud of smoke and the resounding boom of the explosion. But if you’ve noticed, most of these clips are very old, often dating back many decades. Modern nuclear weapons have achieved staggering heights of […]

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