Lonely flies, like many humans, eat more and sleep less

COVID-19 lockdowns scrambled sleep schedules and stretched waistlines. One culprit may be social isolation itself. Scientists have found that lone fruit flies quarantined in test tubes sleep too little and eat too much after only about one week of social isolation, according to a new study published in Nature. The findings, which describe how chronic separation from the […]

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Magnets could offer better control of prosthetic limbs

For people with amputation who have prosthetic limbs, one of the greatest challenges is controlling the prosthesis so that it moves the same way a natural limb would. Most prosthetic limbs are controlled using electromyography, a way of recording electrical activity from the muscles, but this approach provides only limited control of the prosthesis. Researchers […]

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EPA accused again of compromising chemical safety assessments

Four scientists who work in the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention are continuing to accuse higher-ups at the agency of compromising the scientific integrity of chemical assessments it produces, stepping up their allegations. Last month, the scientists asserted that managers at the EPA’s chemical safety office have ‘improperly altered’ […]

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India’s import restrictions leaves researchers facing months-long delays to access equipment and chemicals

India’s restrictions on imports in a bid to boost domestic manufacture has hit its research groups in several public-funded institutes that import most of their advanced scientific instruments and chemicals. Some projects ‘have gone into a state of hibernation’ due to delays in purchasing imported instruments, says Harinath Chakrapani, an organic chemist at the Indian […]

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Martin who?

Anna Marie Roos is one of those scholars, who make this historian of Early Modern science feel totally inadequate. Her depth and breadth of knowledge are awe inspiring and her attention to detail lets the reader know that what she is saying is with a probability bordering on certainty accurate and correct. Over the years […]

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Engineers Grow 3D Bioprinted Blood Vessel

Vascular diseases such as aneurysms, peripheral artery disease and clots inside blood vessels account for 31% of global deaths. Despite this clinical burden, cardiovascular drug advancements have slowed over the past 20 years. The decrease in cardiovascular therapeutic development is attributed to the lack of efficiency in converting possible treatments into approved methods, specifically due […]

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Magnetic Field May Provide New Ways of Dating Ancient Archaeological Artifacts

Archaeologists traditionally rely on finding organic remains for radiocarbon dating to pinpoint new finds in time, but often these are not found on sites dating over 5,000 years ago.  As a result, dating sites in the ancient Levant from the Holocene (the last ca. 10,000 years) can be problematic – leading archaeologists and geophysicists to expand the […]

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Saturn Makes Waves in its Own Rings

In the same way that earthquakes cause our planet to rumble, oscillations in the interior of Saturn make the gas giant jiggle around ever so slightly. Those motions, in turn, cause ripples in Saturn’s rings. In a new study accepted in the journal Nature Astronomy, two Caltech astronomers have analyzed those rippling rings to reveal new […]

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With delta variant dominant, COVID-19 Simulator sees surge in deaths

As delta surges, what can we expect if vaccination and mask-wearing rates don’t change? According to investigators who previously developed the COVID-19 Simulator — which models the trajectory of the illness in the U.S. at the state and national levels — the combination of variant’s high transmissibility, low vaccination coverage in several regions, and more relaxed attitudes […]

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