Evidence of prehistoric human activity in Falkland Islands

Since its first recorded sighting by European explorers in the 1600s, scientists and historians have believed that Europeans were the first people to ever set foot on the Falkland Islands. Findings from a new University of Maine-led study, however, suggests otherwise; that human activity on the islands predates European arrival by centuries. Kit Hamley, National […]

Read More

Death rate from Parkinson’s rising in US

A new study shows that in the last two decades the death rate from Parkinson’s disease has risen about 63% in the United States. The research is published in the October 27, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that the death rate was […]

Read More

Poor parents receiving universal payments increase spending on kids

When given cash with no strings attached, low- and middle-income parents increased their spending on their children, according to Washington State University research. The study, published in the journal Social Forces, also found that the additional funding had little impact on child-related expenditures of high-income parents. For the study, WSU sociologist Mariana Amorim analyzed spending […]

Read More

Behavioral synchronization in complex societies of feral horses

When testing hypotheses on how horses synchronize their herd behavior, computational modeling is a must. So much more is happening among the many mares, stallions, and foals that simple math equations cannot fathom. “Much like human societies, horses have a much more complex society than most birds or fish, for which there are many successful […]

Read More

Giant pandas’ distinctive black and white markings provide effective camouflage

The high-contrast pattern of giant pandas helps them blend in with their natural environment. Researchers at the University of Bristol, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Jyväskylä have used state-of-the art image analysis techniques to demonstrate, counterintuitively, that the unique colourings work to disguise the giant panda. The results have been published today in Scientific […]

Read More

Astronomers discover massive galaxy ‘shipyard’ in the distant universe

Even galaxies don’t like to be alone. While astronomers have known for a while that galaxies tend to congregate in groups and clusters, the process of going from formation to friend groups has remained an open question in cosmology. In a paper published in the Astronomy & Astrophysics Journal, an international team of astronomers reports the discovery […]

Read More

Nanoparticles in full flow

As a chemist who has spent many years in the research and development departments of the coatings industry, Chris Simmons knows the struggle of working with nanoparticles, particularly in powder form. ‘There were always concerns about a lack of industrial scale and the perception of costs that would outweigh the benefits. However, as a formulator, […]

Read More

How Glycogen is Linked to Heat Generation in Fat Cells

Humans carry around with them, often abundantly so, at least two kinds of fat tissue: white and brown. White fat cells are essentially inert containers for energy stored in the form of a single large, oily droplet. Brown fat cells are more complex, containing multiple, smaller droplets intermixed with dark-colored mitochondria — cellular organelles that […]

Read More

Years after cancer treatment, sleepless nights

Once the stress of a cancer diagnosis and its intensive treatments have passed, the hope is that life can return to normal. But we know that this is not true for many people who have had treatments for cancer, and sleep is often impacted for a long time after treatment. Researchers at the American Cancer Society studied […]

Read More