Common chemicals in electronics and baby products harm brain development

Chemicals increasingly used as flame retardants and plasticizers pose a larger risk to children’s brain development than previously thought, according to a commentary published today in Environmental Health Perspectives. The research team reviewed dozens of human, animal, and cell-based studies and concluded that exposure to even low levels of the chemicals—called organophosphate esters—may harm IQ, attention, and memory […]

Read More

Intelligence emerging from random polymer networks

Reservoir computing (RC) tackles complex problems by mimicking the way information is processed in animal brains. It relies on a randomly connected network that serves as a reservoir for information and ultimately leads to more efficient outputs. For realizing RC directly in matter (instead of simulating it in a digital computer), numerous reservoir materials have […]

Read More

‘Genius dogs’ show exceptional learning capacities

Does your dog understand you? All dogs are smart but some are uniquely talented in learning words. According to a new study, just published in Royal Society Opens Science these gifted dogs can learn up to 12 new toy names in one week. Not only that, but they also can remember the new toy names for […]

Read More

Cell “Fingerprinting” Could Yield Long-Awaited Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic

A technology developed by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows great promise for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms arise, potentially changing the course of research and treatment for this condition, which affects millions of people worldwide and is estimated to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. “This is a […]

Read More

Thousands of Unknown Chemicals, Caffeine Found in E-Cigarettes

Vaping aerosols contain thousands of unknown chemicals and substances not disclosed by manufacturers, including industrial chemicals and caffeine, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. The study is the first to apply to vaping liquids and aerosols an advanced fingerprinting technique used to identify chemicals in food and wastewater. The results, just published in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, suggest […]

Read More

Method recycles COVID masks for reuse

Technology created at the University of South Florida (USF) could be the key to safely reusing disposable face masks. Researchers have figured out a way to rapidly disinfect and electrostatically recharge N95 respirators, recovering their original filtration efficiency and protection capability against COVID-19 and other airborne diseases. In their study published in Environment Science & Technology, the […]

Read More

Blasts from the past – how medieval gunpowder changed over 100 years

Master gunners tinkered with their gunpowder recipes in an attempt to balance blast, safety and cost in late medieval Europe – the time when guns began to dominate warfare. A new study found broad changes in the proportions of gunpowder’s three ingredients – charcoal, sulfur and saltpetre – in more than 20 gunpowder recipes dating […]

Read More

Google PageRank Algorithm

Every time we search something like ‘Why isn’t 11 pronounced onety-one’ or ‘Why isn’t there an E grade’ on Google, the algorithm behind the search engine runs through its corpus of data to find the answers which are most suitable for the question to give the user. This blog will explore the Google Pagerank system, […]

Read More

Explainer: why has asymmetric organocatalysis won the chemistry Nobel prize?

In a rather unexpected move by the Nobel committee, this year’s prize in chemistry has been awarded to the two organic chemists who developed asymmetric organocatalysis more than two decades ago: Benjamin List from the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Germany, and David MacMillan from Princeton University, US. Their work has shown that simple small organic molecules […]

Read More