Experimental observations of bubbles containing multiple electrons

Chemists at the Indian Institute of Science have produced bubbles that contain either six or eight electrons. The bubbles are nanometre-sized cavities, which are formed by injecting electrons into liquid helium. Cooling helium-4 causes it to behave like a superfluid, something with zero viscosity. Eventually, the injected electrons come to a standstill and open a […]

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They also serve…

In 1610, Galileo published his Sidereus Nuncius, the first publication to make known the new astronomical discoveries made with the recently invented telescope. Source: Wikimedia Commons Although, one should also emphasise that although Galileo was the first to publish, he was not the first to use the telescope as an astronomical instrument, and during that early […]

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Renaissance Science – XIII

As already explained in the fourth episode of this series, the Humanist Renaissance was characterised by a reference for classical literature, mostly Roman, recovered from original Latin manuscripts and not filtered and distorted through repeated translations on their way from Latin into Arabic and back into Latin. It was also a movement that praised a […]

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Divining the future in the past

This book review needs a little background. Some readers will know the blog post I wrote about meeting historian of astrology, Darrel Rutkin, on a country bus in 2014, whilst reading Monica Azzolini’s excellent The Duke and the Stars: Astrology and Politics in Renaissance Milan. Later I also wrote a review of Darrel’s equally excellent Sapientia Astrologica: Astrology, Magic […]

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Renaissance Science – XII

There is a popular misconception that the emergence of modern science during the Renaissance, or proto-scientific revolution as we defined it in episode V of this series, and the scientific revolution proper includes a parallel rejection of the so-called occult sciences. Nothing could be further from the truth. This period sees a massive revival of […]

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Causes Of Climate Change

Most Important Cause Of Climate Change Human action is the main cause of climate change. Individuals burn fossil fuels and convert land from forests to agriculture. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, people have burned more and more fossil fuels and changed tremendous regions of land from forests to farmland. Burning fossil fuels produces […]

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Nonverbal Communication

Background According to VeryWell Mind, a substantial portion of our communication is nonverbal. Credible researchers have proven that every day we respond to thousands of non-verbal cues and behaviors from the people around us such as posture, facial expression, gestures, and tone of voice. From our handshakes to our hairstyles, nonverbal details reveal our interests, […]

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Pandemonium’s friendly demons

Oliver Selfridge was an early pioneer of artificial intelligence, and in 1959 wrote a classic paper outlining a system by which simple units, each carrying out a specialised function, could be connected together to perform complex, cognitive tasks. This ‘pandemonium architecture‘ inspired research in neural networks, which in turn led to modern machine learning about […]

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Riya Patel: What COVID-19 Has Taught Me

As an aspiring healthcare professional, I wanted to speak out about the relationship between mental health and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (which has now hit the one-year mark), and my own experiences with it. For ages now, the terms “quarantine” and “social distancing” have been around. To many, these concepts have been familiar, and a […]

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